Create a compelling info-graphic in PowerPoint

You’ve got data.  Your audience needs to see the data.  PowerPoint is great at creating graphs and charts.    But is that necessarily a good thing?  A simple click or two can turn your spreadsheet in to an audience overloading blast of info.

If your like me, all the graphs and charts start to look the same.  They all blur into one giant chart with an overwhelming amounts of data.  Wouldn’t it be better if you could create a simple and visually compelling way to represent your data?  Your audience will appreciate you for it.

For example take this graph on increasing home values from 1980 to 2000.

Sleep Inducing Graph

Pretty boring right?  You’ve seen this a million times and it could just as well be a graphic on how board your audience is getting with each generic graph in your presentation.

But there is hope! Enter the info-graphic.

Instead of relying on a pre-generated graph to display your data, building a compelling info-graphic will tell the story in a much more pleasing an memorable way.  And best of all, it’s easy to do and you don’t need to be a graphic designer.  I simply used two elements from the PresenterMedia library to create this interesting build.  (A build is a method of presenting information in stages, instead of throwing it all out at once)

I used a simple red arrow and and a housing graphic created by one of my partners.

Real Estate Info-Graphic 1

Real Estate Info-Graphic 2

Real Estate Info-Graphic 3

I quickly layered the graphics on top of each other and used a gradient fill on a white shape to obscure portions of the red arrow until I was ready for my audience to see it.  The end result was well worth the couple of extra minutes in took to create the build.

I hope this helps inspire you to create compelling visuals and info-graphics for your next presentation.

Good Presenting!

Art Holden

  • Thanks for the information. I have seen info-graphics and had not thought about using the content from your website to build them for my presentations.

    Keep up the great work.

  • This has been a great help thank you – I am presently teaching myself how to make infographics and have been struggling to decipher which is the best software to use. It would seem that Powerpoint is the least ‘glitchy’ to use… I will let you know how I get on!

    Thanks again

    Stuart

  • Art, thank you for the great tutorials, they are superb!

    One thing that might be helpful, would be to have a download PDF version. As in the case of the tutorial videos, I download them with RealPlayer, so that I can have them handy when I’m burning the midnight oil working. So, a PDF version of the non-video ones, would be real helpful.

    Thanks to all you for the fabulous work you do for us.

    Ed

  • I never used Power Point to make infographics.I think you can also use Photoshop or illustrator to make it.

    • You can use Adobe’s software to create amazing pieces, while PowerPoint may be more limited in some of its creations compared to the Adobe options, it is more likely to be owned by our users, who we love to see maximize the capabilities of this software.


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